8 Best Newton’s second law examples (Practical Explanation)

Formula for Newton's second law examples

In short,

Newton’s second law of motion is all about understanding these three terms:

  1. Acceleration – a
  1. Net Force – Fnet
  1. Mass – m

Now, read the statement of Newton’s 2nd law of motion mentioned below.

Newton’s second law of motion states that:

“The acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied and inversely proportional to mass of the object”

Newton’s second law Examples

Don’t worry. (If you have not understood the above statement)

See this,

Formula used in Newton's second law of motion

Let’s understand the above statement and Newton’s second law examples in a practical way.

(One by One)

Example #1

According to Newton’s second law of motion, 

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object.

Let’s divide this statement in two cases.

Case 1: Acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied on the object.

Newton's second law example showing two animated boys lifting the box

What does it mean?

It’s simple.

As the mass of this box is more, more force is required to lift this box.

So in this case,

Acceleration of the box is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

(More the net force applied on the box, more easily the box will accelerate further)

Case 2: Acceleration is inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In the above case, 

As the box has a large mass, it requires a large amount of force, right.

Now what happens if the mass of the box is less?

See this,

Newton's second law example showing red animated boy with box in his hand

The question is, why is it easy for this boy to lift this box?

The reason is simple,

As the box has less mass, it is easy for this boy to lift the box.

Therefore, 

In this case, acceleration of the box inversely depends upon its mass.

(Less the mass of an object, the more easily that object accelerates further)

Example #2

According to Newton’s second law,

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In this example, consider the bag as an object.

Case 1: Acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied on the object.

Example of Newton's second law of motion in which animated boy is applying a large force on the grey bag

Why is it difficult to move this bag?

It’s simple.

As the mass of the bag is more, more force is required to move it.

So in this case,

Acceleration of the bag is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

(More the net force applied on the bag, the more easily it will accelerate further)

Case 2: Acceleration is inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In the above case, 

As the bag has a large mass, it requires a large amount of force.

Now what happens if the object has less mass.

See this, 

Small animated child pulling the tray showing example of newton's second law of motion

Here, consider the tray as an object.

Now the question is, why is it easy for this child to accelerate this object?

The reason is simple.

As the object has less mass, it is accelerating further easily.

So, 

In this case, acceleration of an object inversely depends upon its mass.

(Less the mass of an object, the more easily that object accelerates further)

Example #3

Have you seen any newton’s second law example in a sport?

Simply think, what happens when you hit the ball by the bat?

How Newton’s second law of motion works here?

Okay, I’ll make this simple.

See this,

Example of newton's second law of motion in which animated baseball player is hitting the orange football

Here, the player has to apply more force in order to hit the football.

It means that, 

Even if the player applies a large force on the ball, the ball will not accelerate easily to a far distance.

(As the mass of the football is more)

Therefore, acceleration of football is inversely proportional to its mass.

Now when a tennis ball is given to the player, see what happens…

Example of newton's second law of motion in which animated baseball player is hitting the green tennis ball

Here, the player has to apply less force in order to hit the ball.

As the tennis ball has less mass, with less amount of force the ball accelerates to a longer distance.

Therefore, 

Acceleration of a tennis ball is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

Example #4

How Newton’s second law of motion works while you are riding a bicycle?

According to definition of Newton’s second law

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object, right.

Let’s understand this statement in two cases.

Case 1: Acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied on the object.

Example of newton's second law of motion in which two animated girls are riding on violet bicycle

Why is it difficult for this girl to accelerate the bicycle?

The reason is simple.

As the mass of the bicycle is more, more force is required to move it, right.

Therefore,

In this case, acceleration of the bicycle is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

(More the net force applied on the bicycle, the more easily it will accelerate further)

Case 2: Acceleration is inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In the above case, as the mass of the bicycle is more, it requires more force to accelerate further.

Example of newton's second law of motion in which animated boy with blue t-shirt rides a red bicycle

Here the mass of the bicycle is less compared to above case.

(Because only one boy is sitting on the bicycle)

So, as the bicycle has less mass, it is easily accelerating further.

Therefore,

In this case, acceleration of the bicycle inversely depends upon its mass.

(Less the mass of an object, the more easily it will accelerate further)

Example #5

How Newton’s second law of motion works, when you simply push the tray?

According to Newton’s 2nd law

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In this example, consider the tray as an object.

Case 1: Acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied on the object.

Example of newton's 2nd law of motion in which animated boy with green t-shirt is pushing the tray with luggage

As the mass of the tray is more, more force is required to accelerate it, right.

Therefore, it is difficult for this boy to accelerate the tray further.

In short, 

Acceleration of the tray directly depends upon the net force applied to it.

(More the net force applied on the tray, the more it will accelerate further easily)

Case 2: Acceleration is inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In the above case, 

As the tray has more mass, it requires more force to accelerate further easily.

Example of newton's 2nd law of motion in which animated boy with green t-shirt is pushing the empty tray

Now the question is, why is it easy for this boy to accelerate the tray?

The reason is, 

Here the mass of the tray is less compared to the above case.

So, as the tray has less mass, it is easily accelerating further.

Therefore,

In this case, acceleration of the tray inversely depends upon its mass.

(Less the mass of the tray, the more easily it will accelerate further)

Example #6

Do you know how Newton’s second law of motion works in the horse cart?

It’s so simple.

According to Newton’s second law of motion, 

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object, right.

In this example, consider the cart as an object.

Example of newton's second law of motion shows that acceleration of horse cart is inversely proportional to its mass

As you can see the cart is not accelerating further easily, because it’s not easy for one single horse to pull the cart.

(As the mass of the cart is very large compared to one single horse)

In short, acceleration of the cart is inversely proportional to its mass.

Now, the cart accelerates further easily when two more horses pull the cart together.

Example of newton's second law of motion shows that acceleration of horse cart is directly proportional to net force applied on it

The cart accelerates further easily because…

Whatever force applied on the cart by three horses together, is very large enough to accelerate the cart forward.

(More the force applied on the cart, the more it will accelerate further easily)

Therefore, 

Acceleration of the cart is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

Example #7

How Newton’s second law of motion applies to a car?

Let’s make this simple.

As per the definition of Newton’s second law

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In this example, consider the car as an object.

See this,

Example of Newton's 2nd law of motion shows that acceleration of car inversely proportional to its mass

When the small boy pushes the car, it’s not easy for him to accelerate the car forward.

(As the mass of the car is very large compared to a small boy)

In short, acceleration of the car is inversely proportional to its mass.

Now when two boys are helping, the car accelerates further easily.

Example of Newton's 2nd law of motion shows that acceleration of car directly proportional to net force applied on it

The question is, why does this car accelerate further easily?

It’s simple.

The force applied by two boys is very large enough to accelerate the car forward.

(More the force you apply on an object, the more it will accelerate further easily)

In short, 

Acceleration of the car is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

Example #8

According to Newton’s second law of motion, 

Acceleration is directly proportional to net force and inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In this example, consider a punching bag as an object.

Again, let’s consider two cases for better understanding.

Case 1: Acceleration is directly proportional to net force applied on the object.

Example of orange animated boxer in Newton's 2nd law of motion shows that acceleration of punching bag directly proportional to net force applied on it

When this guy hits the punching bag, the punching bag accelerates further easily.

Why?

The reason is simple.

This guy applies a very large force on the punching bag.

Therefore, acceleration of the punching bag is directly proportional to the net force applied on it.

(More the force applied on the object, the more it will accelerate further)

Case 2: Acceleration is inversely proportional to mass of the object.

In the above case, due to large force the punching bag accelerates very easily.

Now what happens if a small boy hits the punching bag?

See this,

Example of animated boxer in Newton's 2nd law of motion shows that acceleration of punching bag is inversely proportional to net force applied on it

The question is, why is this punching bag not accelerating easily as seen above?

Here also the boy is applying force, right.

The reason is, 

The punching bag has more mass compared to the small boy.

Hence, acceleration of the punching bag inversely depends upon its mass.

(More the mass of an object, less will be the acceleration of that object)

Therefore, 

In this case, this boy has to apply more force.

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Don’t you think, is easy to remember the statement of Newton’s second law of motion?

(Let me know by leaving a comment)

If you want to read more about the Newton’s laws,

You can check here:

Newton’s second law of motion
Newton’s second law equation
Definition of newton’s second law

Newton’s first law of motion
Newton’s first law example

Newton’s third law of motion
Newton’s third law example

Newton’s laws of motion
How many newton’s laws are there

Newton’s law of cooling
Newton’s law of cooling formula

Newton’s law of inertia
Newton’s law of inertia examples

Newton’s universal law of gravitation

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